6 Ways To Practice Descriptive Writing

Wonderful post! I am now following. 🙂 So important for us newbies!

Rachel Poli

The words don’t always flow well when we sit down to write. Sometimes we have to start off working on a creative writing prompt, take a walk, or even just sit back and sip on our coffee for a moment.

Then we hope some sort of idea will come to us sooner rather than later.

Or if we already have the idea in our hand, but we’re not entirely how to paint that picture worth 1,000 words for our readers.

6 Ways to Practice Descriptive Writing1. Practice different scenerios

Cooking dinner? Take in your sights and smells and even your taste later on. Describe what you’re cooking, the ingredients, how your counter looks, what’s in the sink, etc. Paint your whole kitchen based on that one meal. Mostly likely, not all that description will be needed, but the practice is fun.

2. Look up creative writing prompts

If you type “descriptive writing” into Google, you’re…

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You can improve your novel with these tips

Wonderful post! Please comment, I love to hear from you. Read the entire post, great tips! 🙂

I’m always searching for great writing tips. Believe me, I need all the help I can get. 

When I find a few good tips, I just have to them with y’all.

A few of the 42 listed in Melissa Donovan’s post below, you may already know. But, out of her extensive list, I bet you’ll find one or more that ring your creative bell.

Take a look and tell me what you think.

42 Fiction Writing Tips for Novelists by Melissa Donovan

#1 is my favorite because I love to read.

#15 I’m still working on.

#22 is a tall order but I’m working to achieve.

#25 is a good reminder to stay focused.

#29 on my to-do list.

#40 important to remember.

Did any of these tips speak to you? Which ones?

Are you keeping a list of writing tips?

Do you have a favorite tip to share?

I…

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EDITING 101: 47 – Dangling Modifiers…

Here’s another wonderful post for excellent grammar usage from Adirondack Editing. Susan explains things so well and this is one that has confused me. Pay special attention to the incorrect usage. You will LOL! 🙂

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Originally posted as the Dun Writin’—Now Whut? series on this blog, EDITING 101 is a weekly refresher series for some of you and brand new for others.

Courtesy ofAdirondack Editing

Dangling Modifiers

In a previous article, we discussed dangling participles(EDITING 101:24). Today we’re going to discuss dangling modifiers.

If you remember, “dangling” is another word for “misplaced.” A modifier is a noun or an adjective that amends or explains, adding description to another noun. So a dangling modifier is simply a word modifying a noun that is in the wrong place, thereby making the sentence ambiguous or confusing, and sometimes downright funny.

Incorrect: The woman walked the dog in purple suede cowboy boots.

Correct: The woman in purple suede cowboy boots walked the dog.

Incorrect: We saw several monkeys on vacation in Mexico.

Correct: While on vacation in Mexico, we saw several monkeys.

Incorrect: We saw several…

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EDITING 101: 45 – Do All Your Characters Sound Alike?

Another informative post from Adirondack Editing and Chris the Reading Ape! Newbies: This is important for us to know before we begin whatever draft we are on right now. 🙂 If you do the exercises, let me know how they worked out for you!

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Originally posted as the Dun Writin’—Now Whut? series on this blog, EDITING 101 is a weekly refresher series for some of you and brand new for others.

Courtesy ofAdirondack Editing

Do All Your Characters Sound Alike?

In today’s post, we’re not talking about a writer’s voice, or style. We’re talking about the actual voice your characters use in their dialogue or monologues, and character monotones is a chronic problem I see in many of the manuscripts I edit. As the author, you might not realize this is a difficulty in your own writing, but I think once you read this post and the accompanying links, you’ll begin to see what I mean.

Character voice does not mean writing dialect or phonetic accents. This is dialect:

How do you make out?”

How me mek out?” He pointed upwards to the black rafters of the kitchen. “Tatta Fadda a mek Provide-ance…

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EDITING 101: 44 – Using Beta Readers…

Have you ever (or do you) use beta readers? If you are confused about their purpose and what they can do for you, check out this article from this week’s advice from Adirondack Editing.

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Originally posted as the Dun Writin’—Now Whut? series on this blog, EDITING 101 is a weekly refresher series for some of you and brand new for others.

Courtesy ofAdirondack Editing

Using Beta Readers

A Beta Reader is a person who reads your finished novel and gives you feedback on it before publication—while you still have time to make changes. The term “beta reader” has been adapted from the software industry, where programmers release a beta version of a new program to people who will test it. So think of this as someone “test driving” your book!

Having beta readers is an excellent step in writing your novel, as a good beta reader can vastly improve your book. They serve as a second pair of eyes, ensuring that what you’ve intended to write is really what you have written. A beta reader will read your entire manuscript and develop a personal response…

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EDITING 101: 24 – Split Infinitives and Dangling Participles…

Here is an older article in the series I have been sharing with you from Adirondack Editing. It is one that I missed and wanted to share it because it is my understanding that it is a particular problem for newbies and it was a bit confusing to me. But of course, Susan explains it clearly here. I hope it helps you as it does me.

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Originally posted as the Dun Writin’—Now Whut? series on this blog, EDITING 101 is a weekly refresher series for some of you and brand new for others.

Courtesy of Adirondack Editing

Split Infinitives and Dangling Participles

Editors frequently correct both of these, but one is actually ok to use, while the other is not. Care to make a wager on which one is which before I get started?

Ante up!

What is a split infinitive, after all? It’s a sentence where a word, usually an adverb, interrupts a full verb (or full infinitive). A full infinitive is the verb with the word “to” in front of it—to run, to walk, to spit. The most famous split infinitive is “to boldly go.” Editors and teachers used to mark this as incorrect, but it’s all right to split an infinitive. Some examples are:

  • Lyn continued to quickly run toward the burning building.

  • Willow…

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EDITING 101: 42 – Who, Whom, and other Word Misuses…

This is a continuing series from Adirondack Editing. I want to share this one in particular because whether to use who or whom has confused me for so long! Thank you once again, Susan and Chris! I hope this clears this up for everyone else like it did for me. 🙂

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Originally posted as the Dun Writin’—Now Whut? series on this blog, EDITING 101 is a weekly refresher series for some of you and brand new for others.

Courtesy ofAdirondack Editing

Who, Whom, and other Word Misuses

Erik (The Kid Who Reviews Books), a frequent visitor and commenter on The Story Reading Ape’s blog, requested a post discussing who and whom. Thanks for the suggestion, Erik, and if anyone else has any requests, please leave them in the comments!

Many writers struggle with when to use “who” and when to use “whom,” which are both pronouns. The technical explanation is that “who” is a subjective pronoun; it should be used to refer to the subject of a sentence. “Whom” is an objective pronoun; it should be used to refer to the object of a sentence.

But unless you like to diagram sentences in your sleep, that’s probably way too…

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EDITING 101: 41 – Using the Back of your Book Effectively…

Another great post from Adirondack Editing and Susan and Chris! It may surprise you as it did me what you can do with the back matter of your novel. Read on…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Originally posted as the Dun Writin’—Now Whut? series on this blog, EDITING 101 is a weekly refresher series for some of you and brand new for others.

Courtesy ofAdirondack Editing

Using the Back of your Book Effectively

Back matter” is what comes at the end of your book…after you type “The End.” Some authors don’t do much with it, which is a shame, because you’re missing a great opportunity for highly effective passive marketing. In other words: Free Advertising!

With an e-book, there are no restrictions as to how long your back matter can or should be. At a minimum, this area of the book should contain a polite request for a review, author bio and links, and details of other books you have written. But don’t just stop there—be creative! Why simply list the other books you’ve written? Why not post the entire first chapter of each? It’s a…

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Amazon Has A Fake Book Problem

I have read much advice from David and many accolades from others. I was unaware of this as I am sure are many others, and I gladly share David’s words with you. 🙂

David Gaughran

Fake books – powered by clickfarms – are gatecrashing Amazon’s charts. And despite being aware of the issue for well over a year, Amazon has failed to resolve it.

If you look at the Kindle Store Best Seller charts right now, and click over to Free Books, you will see that the Top 20 currently has five suspicious-looking titles.

None of them have reviews. All were published in the last week. They have no Also Boughts – meaning they have had very few sales. Each of these titles are around 2,500 pages long, seem to have duplicated content, and are enrolled in Kindle Unlimited.

What is going on here?

For over fifteen months now, scammers have been raiding the Kindle Unlimited pot using a well-worn trick. They usually pilfer the content first of all – often by stealing an author’s original work and running it through a synonymizer – and…

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EDITING 101: 38 – Hiring Professionals, Part 2…

Here is the continuation from last week. Don’t miss Part 2! My friend, Susan is so helpful with her tips, be sure to read it all and if you need a refresher, check out last week’s post for the first part. 🙂

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Originally posted as the Dun Writin’—Now Whut? series on this blog, EDITING 101 is a weekly refresher series for some of you and brand new for others.

Courtesy ofAdirondack Editing

Hiring Professionals, Part 2

Further to EDITING 101: 37 – Hiring Professionals, Part 1 last week, today we’re going to finish our discussion on hiring professionals to help you self-publish your book.

  • Book/Copyeditor

Hiring a book editor can be a little trickier than a cover designer, because you can’t see examples of the work ahead of time. Or can you? Almost all freelance book editors offer a free sample edit of your material just so you can see what they will do to your work. If they don’t offer a sample edit for free, walk away. There’s simply no telling what you’re getting into. Even if they offer samples of other peoples’ edits, that’s no indication as to what they’ll do…

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